Summer Wine Pairings

There is an art to pairing food with wine. Nuanced undertones, blushes of flavor, hints of spices, and lingering tastes commingle with personal preferences and memories to create deep interactions that lead to strong opinions. Trying new combinations of wine and food is an endeavor that can be intimidating, but is rewarding upon success.

There are certain accepted pairings; you have red wine with red meat and white wine with most fish, chocolate goes well with red while other desserts trend with whites, etc. Finding the perfect balance of flavors between a dish and a wine is an accomplishment and feels like a victory of sorts. It improves a meal you likely already love, provides a point of conversation, sets up a full dinner lineup for future special events, and is an entertaining experience unto itself.

We wanted to share some of our favorite wine pairings as places to start an adventure (or at the very least a very good evening) this summer. We had several people take on the task of completing this image with some wine and food combinations:

Imagine the slow summer sunset settling over your home, the light catching the edge of your cushions and umbrella as the shadows from your house begin to eclipse the patio. Sitting in a comfortable seat, perhaps a frameless chair by a hammock, you swirl a glass of wine that perfectly finishes your meal, waiting for the stars to appear and the cool air to settle.

Some lovely pairings came to mind and we’ve got those below. We’ve also included a recommended brand or vintage to try if you’re unsure where to start with each varietal/blend. These are not perfect combinations or even liked universally amongst our pairing team, but each has found its way into each of our particular palates this summer.  Read through, find some that intrigue you, experiment, and share!

For an infographic about wine, including red wine vs white wine, click here.

To learn about wine tasting, click here.

Amanda’s Assortment

Sparkling Brut with Mac & Cheese

2007 Extended Tirage Brut

Cheese and wine go together ALL the time … every time. The next time you have a bottle of Brut, make a homemade béchamel sauce for your noodles and if you’re feeling fancy, lump some lobster or crab in there. The balance of salt with the fish and cream of the cheese compliment a more mineral-based Brut. If you’re looking for a nice bottle that won’t break the bank, try Schramsberg’s 2014 Blanc De Noirs ($23) which is a complex brut made of red Pinot Noir grapes. Its name White from Black is just as it suggests. If you have a bit more cash to spend, one of my personal favorites is a brut from Oregon’s Argyle winery – 2007 Extended Tirage Brut ($75). Their 11 yr old Fall barrel brut packs a punch that is nothing but soft and will leave wine lovers with goose bumps.

 Chardonnay and Bacon

Marimar Estate 2009 Acero Unoaked Chardonnay

Most people want to always go red with meats, but go big with a full bodied Chardonnay so it can hold up against bacon that packs a big punch of flavor. The best region to buy a buttery, oaky chardonnay is California. Benovia Russian River Valley Chardonnay ($32) is well balanced with citrus and oak with a long finish. Unoaked is growing MORE popular every day after the oak bomb of the 90’s and another option from the Russian River Valley is Marimar Estate 2009 Acero Unoaked Chardonnay ($29). There’s no oak on this beautiful Chardonnay, but it’s so rich, you won’t even notice and will enjoy the pure personality of chardonnay.

Fruity Riesling and Spicy Tacos

2016 Chateau Ste Michelle Dry Riesling

Switch out the beer for an easy drinking Riesling with tacos this summer, it’s less filling! The fruit balances out against the heat and a hint of citrus found in most Rieslings will pair well with any guacamole. The best most surprising Riesling I’ve had lately came from 2016 Chateau Ste Michelle Dry Riesling ($12) from the Columbia Valley. It’s a dry Riesling that isn’t the sugary/entry wine people start out with. This one is hints towards sweet but brings you back quickly with a crisp finish and goes amazing with any kind of protein.

Red Blends with Burgers

Molly Dooker’s 2016 Two Left Feet

At your next BBQ, break out the blend! You never really know what people will load their burgers with, so a red blend is the best bet so that you aren’t tipping too far into one varietal. Mark Ryan’s 2016 The Dissident ($38) over delivers on tasting notes that is mouth-filling in the various grapes used that balances each blend with each other.If you’re in the mood for a lighter side – give Molly Dooker’s 2016 Two Left Feet ($27) a try and make sure you do the proper Molly Dooker Shake before you pour out.

Tawny Port and S’mores

Fonseca 20 Year Tawny Port

If Summer had a dessert – it would be S’mores and wine’s would be Ports. If you’re looking to pair just the description alone can probably sell you “Ripe berry fruits with a delicate nuttiness and subtle mellow notes of chocolate, butterscotch and fine oak wood. Smooth and silky on the palate and full of ripe figgy, jammy flavors which persist on the long finish.” Enjoy the long and warm structure of the Fonseca 20 Year Tawny Port ($33). Hints of nut with orange peel and cocoa on the nose are a perfect after dinner sipper that packs a punch.

 

Brad’s Best

Barbera and Spinach Chicken A La Fresca

2015 Tempo Vero Barbera, Monferrato DOC

Served at room temperature – From the Monferrato region of Piedmont, Italy. “Tempo Vero” translates from Italian to English as “Real Time,” a name that celebrates winemakers who seek to preserve Italy’s history in liquid form. This 2015 Barbera is from the Monferrato DOC in Piedmont – one of the classic wine locales in Italy. Vibrant with notes of strawberry, cherry, wood, and bright acidity on the palate, it pairs wonderfully with foods like cheese, salami and pasta with cream sauce. Other pairings include – pizza, pork, lamb and veggies.

Touriga Nacional with Beef Tacos

2016 Field Theory Touriga Nacional

Served at room temperature or slightly chilled – From Paso Robles, California. Field Theory highlights curious varietals from unfamiliar places, like this Touriga Nacional from Pomar Junction Vineyard in Paso Robles, CA. The result is a light, early-drinking red with a fresh, fruit-forward flavor. Pro tip: On a warm day, drink slightly chilled. Pairs well with beef, cheeses and veggies.

Pinot Noir with Chicken Cordon Bleu

2014 Porter & Plot Pinot Noir

Served at room temperature – From Sta. Rita Hills, California. Porter & Plot showcases the unique, nuanced individuality of California’s most exceptional vineyards and appellations. In this case, we’re talking about Sta. Rita Hills – an AVA in California’s Central Coast that is highly regarded for luscious, round and premium wines made from Pinot Noir. Enjoy blue fruits, along with a silky texture, and nuances of earthy spice. Pairs well with poultry, pork, cheeses and veggies.

Tempranillo and Palomino Chicken

2016 Copycat Tempranillo

Served at room temperature – From Clarksburg, California. Tempranillo is a grape native to Spain, but this funky-fresh example is a modern one from Clarksburg, California. Thanks to whole berry fermentation (as opposed to the grapes being destemmed), this Tempranillo is more easy drinking than most. You’ll enjoy juicy blue and black fruits, and a little spice that is almost always present in Tempranillo. This red doesn’t require food, and is prime for drinking young. With that said, it pairs well with pasta in red sauces, pork, cured meats and veggies.

Gamay and Grilled Salmon 

2016 Les Bobos Gamay

Served at room temperature or slightly chilled – From Beaujolais (province) in France. Many people associate Burgundy with Pinot Noir, and rightfully so. But in the Southern part of Burgundy in the region of Beaujolais, Gamay is the star and it is not to be ignored. Gamay and Pinot Noir have many things in common, like being light-bodied, easy-drinking, food-friendly and often a great mix of both fruit flavors and complex herbs and spice. This particular example of French Gamay is just that. Gamay wines are often un-oaked and meant to be enjoyed while young and fresh. Pairs very well with poultry, fish, cheeses and cured meats.

 

Heather’s Hoard

Ice Wine with Vanilla Bean Ice Cream

2016 Goose Ridge Riesling Ice Wine

Ice wines are some of the sweetest wines you come across and are often viewed as desserts onto themselves, which is why they are largely considered dessert wines. They pair well with fruits (that match the natural undertones of the wine) and can take the edge off of an extremely spicy meal. I think that an ice wine with a small serving of ice cream can add a level of depth and maturity to an all time favorite. With ice cream or on ice cream…is there truly a difference?

Gewurztraminer and Szechuan Chicken

B Lovely Gewurztraminer

Gewurztraminer has a surprisingly nuanced flavor (given the difficulty of reading or pronouncing the name). The main undercurrents in Gewurztraminer tend to be tropical fruits and spices. In the variety listed above, lychee, pear, and honeysuckle are strong. It is a sweet wine with a bright spirit. It pairs well with dishes that include fragrant spices–ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaf, coriander, curry, etc. As far as a full meal is concerned, I think it works well with a Szechuan Chicken or Chicken Asado; however, I do like this as a dessert all on its own.

Riesling with Chips & Guacamole

2016 Eroica Riesling

Riesling wines are well received as one of the most popular white wines, and are favored as being palatable by both wine lovers and beginners. Riesling is one of my go-to’s for an evening drink because of how well it pairs with other foods. I’m especially fond of pairing Riesling with latin and asian dishes, and it goes surprisingly well with salty or fried foods, like onion rings. Chips and guacamole, while not a meal, have the salt, spice, and variety that can be lost if you use an aggressive wine.

Syrah with Bacon-Wrapped Filet Mignon

2015 Chateau Ste Michelle Syrah

Syrah varietals are powerful red wines that can range from medium to full bodied, with low to high tannin levels depending on the region in which the grapes were grown. Syrah will often have notes of blackberry, blueberry, and violet, with rich, earthy undertones of leather and punchy spices like pepper, mint, and anise. Due to the acidity of a Syrah, they don’t always pair well with cheeses and tend to do well with beef, pork, and probably chocolate. Bacon-wrapped filet mignon checks two of those boxes so it’s my choice for a summer grilled dish to pair with Syrah.

Merlot with Pizza

2014 Reserve Merlot Pheasant Run Vineyard

Merlot wines are smooth Bordeaux reds that favor fruity undertones (plum, cherry, and currants especially) with notes of chocolate, herbs and occasionally hints of cedar or other woods. Merlots can be difficult to pair with foods because they’re not as acidic or have the tannins of bolder reds, and can be overwhelmed or overwhelm other foods. Merlot pairs well with red meats, red sauce dishes, fish, shellfish and as well as mushroom dishes. As Amanda, mentioned, cheese does pair well with most wines; in this case, it lends to a fulfilling experience of a red wine and pizza.

Have a favorite pairing of your own? Let us know.

Summer Wine Pairings

Favorite BBQ + Grill Recipes

This week we asked our employees for their favorite grill recipes. Our submissions ranged from grilled salmon kebabs and spicy Tunisian grilled chicken to smoked potato salad and Tandoori Paneer Tikka, a traditional Indian dish. We also received plenty more tasty, easy-to-make options! Try putting one or two of these recipes to use this grill season. Enjoy!

Grilled Salmon Kebabs 

This recipe was submitted by Stacy Laurent, our Accounting Supervisor. Stacy is hoping to try this recipe this summer because her family “loves salmon and [she] thought this would be a different way to serve it up.” See the link below for the full recipe:

Grilled Salmon Kebabs

Grilled Asparagus

This next recipe was submitted by Laura Engstrom, a Production Artist on the Creative Solutions team. She originally “didn’t think asparagus was all that good…until [she] had it grilled.” The instructions for preparing grilled asparagus are simple:

Ingredients:

  • Fresh asparagus spears, trimmed
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

  • Preheat the grill to high heat
  • Coat the asparagus spears with the olive oil lightly. Season with salt and pepper
  • Grill over heat for 2-3 minutes, or to desired tenderness

Recipe from allrecipes.com, “Grilled Asparagus.”

Spicy tunisian grilled chicken

Heather Thomas, our eCommerce Marketing Specialist, submitted this recipe.

Ingredients:

  • 1-2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts (depending on your preferred spice density, I use 1 breast)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Tunisian Style Spice Mix

Spice Mix:

  • 1 tablespoon Coriander
  • 1 tablespoon Caraway Seeds
  • 1 tablespoon Crushed Red Pepper
  • 1 teaspoon Cayenne Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Garlic Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Onion Powder
  • 1 teaspoon Salt
  • Fresh ground pepper to taste

Instructions:

“I usually make the spice mix and coat the chicken in the spices, drizzling a tablespoon of olive oil over it once the rub is slightly set in. I let this marinate overnight in the refrigerator and grill to taste. Served with corn that’s been spiced with salt, cumin and coriander.”

Brad’s Mac & Cheese

Brad Dorcik, one of our Online Merchandisers, recommends this unique Mac & Cheese recipe. “I’ve always loved Macaroni & Cheese, but it wasn’t until I started using the grill that our relationship grew,” he said. See below for Brad’s recipe:

Prep Time: 15 min

Cook Time: 30 min

Total Time: 45 min

4 to 6 Servings

Ingredients:

  • 1 red pepper
  • 1 green pepper
  • 1 pound elbow macaroni
  • 1/2 salted butter
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup grated Asiago cheese
  • 1 cup Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1/2 cup white Cheddar
  • 1/2 cup Parmigiano-Reggiano
  • 1 1/2 cup cups yellow sharp Cheddar
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper, plus 1/2 teaspoon
  • 1/2 jalapeno pepper, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup seasoned bread crumbs (optional)

Instructions:

  • Preheat grill to 350 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Quarter red and green peppers, place them on the grill, cooking until tender
  • Once grill marks are formed, remove peppers from grill and set aside
  • Cook elbow macaroni in boiling water (salt optional) until al dente – drain and set aside
  • In a large saucepan, over medium heat, melt butter and whisk in flour to thicken, about 1 minute
  • Add 1 cup of milk and whisk in – begin adding cheeses, 1 at a time, thoroughly whisking each cheese
  • If sauce becomes too thick, add remaining cup of milk
  • Once all blended – stir in salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper, grilled peppers, jalapeño peppers
  • Add elbows to the mixture and stir to combine again
  • With everything combined, add mixture to a cast iron 9” x 13” rectangular casserole dish
  • Sprinkle top with bread crumbs (optional) and an additional ½ teaspoon of cayenne pepper
  • Place on grill for 12 minutes – let stand a few minutes before serving. Enjoy!

Amanda’s steak marinade

Amanda Perry, our Marketing Specialist, recommends this steak marinade for your favorite cuts of meat. She recommends applying the marinade 4-8 hours before cooking.

Ingredients:

 

 

 

 

 

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 3 tablespoons dried basil
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons dried parsley flakes
  • 1 teaspoon ground pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon hot pepper sauce (optional)
  • 2 minced garlic cloves
  • Couple splashes of good red wine

 

Instructions:

“Mix all ingredients in a blender and pour over steaks. Refrigerate from 4 to 8 hours.
If desired, add big cuts of raw onion rings to the marinade and throw on the grill with the steaks to get a nice char. Top the steaks with the onions and enjoy!”

D’s Turkey Rollbars

Dorik, our Art Director, has a fun and original grill recipe he came up with and tried on the grill last week. He likes to call them, “D’s Turkey RollBars.” Here’s how to make one:

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound of ground turkey
  • 3/4 cup of roasted cauliflower (roughly chopped)
  • 1/2 cup frozen kale (thawed and squeezed)
  • 1/2 cup roasted beets (roughly chopped)
  • 3 TB cilantro dressing (cilantro, red wine vinegar, olive oil, jalapenos, salt and pepper)

Instructions:

  • Mix all together and form a candy bar shape (like a 3 musketeers)
  • Place on hot grill. Grill all 4 sides until golden (about 2 min per side)
  • Remove from grill and get ready. Next few steps need to go quickly
  • Get that flat top grill heated up and place a large tortilla of choice on the hot grill
  • Once both side are slightly golden put a spoonful of the cilantro dressing, swirl it around the tortilla before placing a cheese blend of your choice on top
  • Next, place the turkey bar in the middle, top it with cottage cheese and a shake of hot sauce before rolling the whole thing up (be careful, its hot)
  • Continue to cook the Turkey RollBar until the sides are to your liking. A good golden brown with a few char marks is what I like
  • (Optional) You can also make a dipping sauce with more cottage cheese and hot sauce if you like (I do)

Dorik was featured last August in our grill vlog where he cooked up his own burger recipe, perfect for National Grilling Month. Recipe included in the video and in this blog post.

Smoked potato salad

Submitted by our V.P. of Business Development, Shuyler Mowe.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. small (about 1” x 1”) Yukon Gold Potatoes
  • ½ Cup Green Onion
  • 1 Cup diced Red Onion
  • 2 Cups Arugula

Dressing:

  • ¼ Cup Olive Oil
  • 3 TBSP Dijon Mustard
  • 1 TBSP Red wine vinegar
  • 2 Cloves minced garlic
  • 1 TBSP chopped dill
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ½ tsp pepper

Instructions:

  • Prepare dressing, combine all ingredients in mixing bowl.  Let stand for at least one hour
  • Slice potatoes in half, lengthwise.  Parboil potatoes in salted water until just pierceable with a fork, but not past this.  You want potatoes to be firm.  Undercooking potatoes is not a huge deal as you can make up for it in the smoker, but do not overcook
  • Using wood chips of choice (I prefer Mesquite for this), get smoker up to 250 degrees.  If using a rack smoker, wrap racks in foil to prevent potatoes from falling through.  If using a barrel or other smoker type, use a sheet pan to prevent falling through
  • Smoke potatoes for 35-45 minutes.  When potatoes have absorbed smoke, they will have a browned appearance on the fleshy side and will not be crispy, but somewhat firm.  It is important that potatoes do not fall apart.  They should be distinct pieces when they go into the salad

Make the salad:

“Put potatoes in bowl and refrigerate for 30 minutes.  Then combine with vegetable ingredients and add dressing.  Mix and enjoy or refrigerate until serving.  This salad has a very unique, savory flavor that is great for a unique twist on a potato salad side and is relatively healthy as it avoids mayo.”

Tandoori Paneer tikka

Image: By Namitakhaire [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons
Shruthi Desai, our eCommerce Marketing Manager, suggests Tandoori Paneer Tikka with grilled vegetables. An Indian dish, Tandoori Paneer Tikka is described by Padma Veeranki, a blogger on Masalakorb.com as:

“Hearty morsels of soft and crumbly Paneer marinated in a delicious mix of Yoghurt and spices, skewered and then grilled till golden brown in a tandoor, thus giving it a wonderful and distinctive smoky flavour. Of course most of us home-cooks have no access to a tandoor, but this dish tastes equally good grilled over charcoal, in an oven or even on a skillet. The recipe is pretty simple and straight forward [even] though you see a long list of ingredients.”

Paneer is a fresh cheese and is often known as Indian cottage cheese, according to Masalakorb.com. The term “tandoor” refers to a “variety of ovens, the most commonly known [being] a cylindrical clay or metal oven used in cooking or baking.” Tandoors are commonly used in Southern, Central, and Western Asia.

Tandoors in Turkmenistan. Image: By David Stanley [CC BY 2.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Fried Paneer. Image: By Biswarup Ganguly [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See the blog post below for the recipe and instructions:

Tandoori Paneer Tikka With Grilled Veggies

Grilled lamb with rosemary, garlic, and cardamom

Kathryn Pinkney, our Creative Solutions Manager, recommends her grilled lamb with rosemary, garlic, and cardamom.

Serves: 10 to 15, depending on everyone’s appetite!

Prep: 20 minutes or less

Marinate: at least 8 hours or overnight. Note – The lamb can marinate up to 48 hours.

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Purchase:

  • Boneless and Butterflied Leg of Lamb (about 5 lbs)
  • Trim as much silver skin from the meat.

Marinade:

  • Cardamom – powdered, 1-2 teaspoon
  • Dry mustard – 1 Tablespoon
  • Apple Cider Vinegar – 1 Tablespoon
  • Rosemary –  3-4 6 inch twigs fresh (pull leaves off the stems) or 3 Tablespoon of dried
  • Fresh Garlic – one whole – minced or pressed
  • Spicy Brown Mustard – 1/2 cup
  • Olive Oil – 2 teaspoons
  • Frozen Apple Juice – 1/4 cup
  • Black Pepper, freshly ground
  • Salt (Kosher preferable)
  • Optional: Feta Cheese, crumbled

Instructions:

  • Combine the first 2 ingredients in a small bowl. Gradually whisk in the vinegar and let stand for 15 minutes or so
  • Whisk in the rosemary, garlic, spicy mustard, olive oil, frozen apple juice. Season the marinade to taste with the salt and pepper
  • To marinate the meat you will need either an extra large ziplock bag or a 15 x 10 x 2 inch glass baking dish. (I prefer the zip lock baggie)
  • Glass dish Method  – pour 1/2 of the marinade in the bottom of the dish. Place the meat on top then pour the balance of the marinade over the meat. Using clean hands, massage the marinade into the meat until thoroughly coated. Cover the dish with plastic wrap and chill. It is best to turn the meat at least once to incorporate the marinade
  • Zip Lock Baggie Method – pour the whole marinade into the bag followed by the meat. Zip the bag shut taking care to move as much air out of the bag as you can. Now the fun part…. Massage the marinade into the meat for 2-3 minutes. Then place the baggie in a large bowl or dish (this is your safety in case your bag zipping skills aren’t perfect).  Place in the fridge to chill. I like to pull the meat out every 2-3 hours to turn over and massage

Grill:

  • Prepare your BBQ (medium heat)
  • Place the lamb on the grill. Reserve the marinade in a dish to use during the cooking)
  • Grill 15 minutes, brushing with the marinade frequently
  • Turn the lamb over, brush again with the marinade and grill until an instant read thermometer* registers 130ºF at the thickest part of the meat – this is medium-rare (BTW – check the temp of the lamb often – nothing worse than overcooked lamb)
  • Grill for about 5 more minutes per side.

*NOTE – if you don’t own an instant read thermometer, buy one. You can get one for under $15 bucks and it is well worth it. Once you use one, you’ll never go back to one of those old-fashioned dial versions – they are not accurate at all.

Additional Notes:

  • Transfer the lamb to a cutting board, cover with foil and let rest 15 minutes (don’t omit or rush this step or the meat will be dried out)
  • With a very sharp knife, slice the lamb thinly across the grain (1/8” or less). Arrange on a serving platter and sprinkle the feta over the lamb
  • If you prefer thicker slices, do so! I find that if I have leftovers and want to reheat, a thicker slice won’t over cook/dry out
  • I recommend an accompaniment of rice and a grilled vegetable (zucchini, carrots, corn – actually any type of vegetable that won’t fall apart on the grill works too)
  • I also recommend  a side of sliced cucumbers with yogurt or sour cream with just some salt and pepper

“This is one of my favorite meals – I’ve grilled this lamb several times for large groups of friends. Most recently I prepared this BBQ Lamb while offsite on Bainbridge Island, WA. Not only is it a “show stopper”, but it’s easy to assemble, marinate, and then cook after a long day of shooting Classic Accessories covers. My way to grill!”

 

We hope you enjoy these recipes and put some to use during National Grilling Month!

Favorite BBQ + Grill Recipes

All About Grills

Image: Salimfadhley at Wikipedia

Since it’s National Grilling Month, we decided to focus on everything you need to know to care for your grill, and what you need to know if you’re in the market for a new grill or are curious as to the advantages and disadvantages to other types of grills (combo, wood-pellet, electric, and portable grills, as well as smokers). Without further ado, let the grilling commence!

Knowing/Choosing Your Grill

A prominent debate among grill enthusiasts is whether charcoal grills or gas grills are superior. Check out this blog post for more information about the debate. We did some research and came up with some concrete advantages and disadvantages to both charcoal and gas grills to help provide some transparency as to which one is best for you as well as profiles on a variety of gas and charcoal grill types you may be interested in this grill season. If you already own either a charcoal or gas grill, there are some notes on how to optimize it and achieve the best end result to your grilling.

Charcoal Grills

Charcoal grills are all about flavor. Owners commend the smoky, chargrilled flavor from the grill in the food they cook. Charcoal grills are the most common type of outdoor grill, according to The Home Depot. This stat includes both backyards, parks, and other areas, whereas, gas grills are the most popular backyard grill exclusively. Here are the different types of charcoal grills out there:

Image: lightfusegetaway at en.wikipedia
Damper on top of a kettle grill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kettle Charcoal Grills

The kettle is one of the most common types of charcoal grill, created in 1951 by George Stephen Sr., who founded Weber-Stephen Products Co. (you may know the brand today simply as Weber). Kettle grills are portable, easy to use, and simple in their anatomy with a bowl and lid, cooking grate, charcoal grate, damper to control the heat, and a cleaning system (for Weber it’s a one-touch cleaning system).

Furthermore, the cleaning system acts as ventilation; if you open the vents, more oxygen will enter your grill, causing the coals to heat faster, which will speed up the grilling process. By closing them you’re cutting off the oxygen for slower cooking time. Check out Weber’s article on the anatomy of a common Weber kettle grill for more information.

 

Offset Charcoal Grills AKA Offset Smoker

The offset grill is a versatile charcoal grill that allows you to grill or smoke your food. These grills tend to be for people who are willing to tend to and monitor their cooking (and pay into a higher price point for a good model). There is a chamber dedicated to producing heat and smoke which holds your choice of charcoal and smoke wood off to the side that feeds into the main cooking chamber which holds shelves that can hold a variety of foods. You can control the flow between the firebox and the cooking chamber using the intake and exhaust vents on the grill. You can modify these to cook directly by adding a grill grate in the chamber holding the charcoal/wood chips. A good offset smoker will be made of thick materials for heat stability (ideally some form of steel)  and will likely be heavier than your typical grill. Learn more about these grills on the Barbecue Bible Site.

Big Green Egg Grill
Our Senior Graphic Designer, Dorik Downing, on his Kamado Joe grill.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kamado Charcoal Grills

The kamado grill is a ceramic charcoal grill designed to trap heat and smoke for maximum absorption into the food. While not as portable as a kettle, the kamado still maintains temperature and air flow like a kettle through vents in the top and bottom. Some common brands of kamado grills are Kamado Joe and Big Green Egg. This article outlines the differences between the brands, including prices. Dorik Downing, our senior graphic designer, uses a Kamado Joe grill and recommends 100% Natural Lump Charcoal. Check out our vlog from last August featuring Dorik on the grill whipping up one of his tasty and healthy burgers (recipe included and perfect for national grilling month).

Our Ravenna Kamado Ceramic Grill Cover.

We recommend investing in one of our kamado grill covers to keep your Big Green Egg or Kamado Joe grill clean and ready for use during grill season, as well as safely secured during the offseason.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Park Style Charcoal Grills

The park style charcoal grill is a common charcoal grill often found in parks and campgrounds. You can also buy them for use in your own yard, as a simple grill option. These grills are fairly durable, easy to maintain and allow for quick cooking and experimentation with charcoal and wood chip types. Here’s a helpful article on tips for using this grill if you’re taking your cookout to a public venue or have one set up in your backyard.

If you’re interested further in charcoal grills, here’s a Home Depot guide on how to use them.

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Charcoal Grill Advantages:

  • Rich, smoky chargrilled flavor
  • Inexpensive grill
  • Can reach higher heat levels than a gas grill – 700 degrees Fahrenheit

Disadvantages:

  • Added expense to buy new charcoal after each grill
  • Slower heat-up time – makes for longer grill process
  • More cleanup than other grills to get rid of charcoal ash

Gas (Natural gas or Propane) Grills

Gas grills, as mentioned earlier, are the most popular type of backyard grill. Gas grills can either use natural gas or propane (propane typically involves a tank, as shown peeking out at the lower right of the image of the grill above). Both are cost-effective; although, if you’re using a natural gas line running from your house, you’ll be restricted as to where you can put your grill, whereas with propane grills (and charcoal grills) you can typically pick any safe spot on or off your patio. There aren’t many variations in style for gas grills, but there is capacity for added accessories, such as side burners, lights, and integrated food thermometers.

Advantages:

  • Gas grills heat up faster than charcoal grills
  • Wider variety of accessory options such as side burners, lights, and food thermometers built in to the grill
  • Natural gas or propane can be used for fuel
    • Propane tanks are easy to find, don’t cost much, and are refillable
  • Easier to regulate heat with built-in control knobs
    • Different heat zones can be created for searing, cooking, or warming food on the grill
  • Easier cleanup than a charcoal grill

Disadvantages:

  • Smoky, charcoal flavor is lost since propane burns cleaner than charcoal
  • Does not reach the same levels of heat that a charcoal grill does, but still reaches up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit
  • Not as portable as a kettle grill, for instance
  • A bit pricier than a kettle

If you’re interested in gas grills, here’s Home Depot’s guide on how to use one.

Combo Grills

Another type of grill is the combo grill, which is essentially a grill with one side dedicated to charcoal grilling and the other to gas grilling. Some combo grills even have a smoker integrated. Be careful, though: not all combo grills allow you to simultaneously use the charcoal and gas grills, so make sure the combo grill you’re investing in has this feature if you want it.

Main Advantage:

  • Has the ability to function as a gas or charcoal grill

Main Disadvantage:

  • May not be able to use these functions simultaneously

Wood pellet Grills

Similar to the offset charcoal grill, this type of grill generally has multiple chambers, although the fire chamber tends to be smaller. A wood pellet grill gives you the opportunity to grill your food over a real wood fire. To use such a grill, you’ll have to invest in wood pellets, which come in different types such as hickory or cherry, and then feed them into a hopper attached to the side of the grill. As you continue grilling, you’ll have to add more pellets in. Here’s an article on how to properly care and maintain your pellet grill.

 

Main Advantage:

  • Natural grilling taste reminiscent of a campfire

Main Disadvantage:

  • You have to tend to and keep up the supply of wood chips more regularly than a gas or charcoal grill

Smokers

 

Smoking is the act of slowly cooking food at low temperatures over a longer period of time. The result is rich, smoky, flavor-filled food that a grill simply could not replicate. Smokers can be fueled by propane, charcoal, or electricity. Here’s The Home Depot’s in-depth guide into the world of smoking and how it’s done.

Main Advantage:

  • Deep, rich flavors

Main Disadvantage:

  • Long cooking process

Electric Grills

Electric grills are perfect for situations in apartments or condominiums as these places sometimes do not allow charcoal or gas grills. All you need is to be near an electrical outlet to begin grilling. Electric grills cook food evenly and require very little set up or cleanup afterwards, however they do miss out on capturing any kind of flavor during the cooking process. Perhaps their strongest trait, though, is their portability, as tabletop electric grills can be taken anywhere with an outlet.

Main Advantage:

  • Great for apartments and places where you can’t have a gas or charcoal grill

Main Disadvantage:

  • Aren’t typically able to add the same flavor nuances as charcoal, wood, or even gas grills

Portable Grills

Portable grills come in charcoal, gas, and electric types and can be used essentially anywhere, predominately at tailgates and camping trips, but could certainly be used for backyard grilling. Unfortunately, though, its portability results in less square footage to grill for a big group of people or a large family gathering. On the same token, however, if you’re dealing with a patient bunch, who says you can’t take a little bit extra time to cook everyone’s food?

Main Advantage:

  • Very portable

Main Disadvantage:

  • Size restrictive as well as a long cooking process

Grill Cleaning and Maintenance

Charcoal grill

For cleaning charcoal grills, it’s important to clean the grill grate with a brush and then clean the charcoal grate. Make sure to clean out the ash in the grill as well. According to amazingribs.com, “ash holds moisture and can chemically attack steel.” They also add that ashes should always go in a metal can since “embers can glow far longer than you think.” For kettle grills, as mentioned in our 12 grill tips/tricks blog post, line the basin of the kettle below the charcoal grate with aluminum foil so that you can easily dispose of the ash once you’re done grilling without much of a hassle.

Gas Grill

This video has instructions on how to maintain and clean your gas grill.

General Maintenance

For all grills, it’s important to have cleanings and to check that all of the connections and pathways are clean, clear and functioning correctly for safety. Regular maintenance and cleaning can help your grill work better and last longer.

We recommend taking the following steps minimally:

  1.  If you haven’t used your grill for a while, or plan to not use it for a while, make sure to double check your hoses and connections to ensure that everything is whole and stable. If you have a gas grill, double check the propane connection and tank. Please.
  2. Clean your grates of excessive debris at least twice a season and right before you winterize (go for every time you cook if you can).
  3. Do check your grease trap seasonally if you have one and clean it out so it can continue doing its job next season.
  4. Clean the whole grill at the end of the season if you’re going to store it or not use it for a season

One additional tip we have for you to maintain your grill, no matter the type, is to throw a grill cover on. Why cover your grill, you may ask? First and foremost, a cover is a way limit your grill’s exposure to natural elements, such as rainfall, dust, leaves, etc. It can help prevent dirt and debris from getting stuck in catch pans where fires could start. While some worry that covers mean that your grill is at risk of rusting from condensation, our grill and BBQ covers are designed to combat that particular issue with air vents, as pictured below. Check out one of our earlier blog posts for more detailed information about why you should cover your grill.

Ravenna BBQ grill cover. Link below.

 

A vent on the side of a Ravenna cover.

Ravenna BBQ Grill Cover

Happy grilling for the rest of this summer!

Sources:
The Home Depot
Living Direct
Wikipedia: Weber-Stephen Products

All About Grills

12 Grill Tips/Tricks

 

It’s National Grilling Month, and what better way to kick off a fun month of grilling than to put some quick grill tips and tricks to use. Let the grilling begin!

1. Clean your grill and grate with a grill brush after preheating

This tip sounds like a no-brainer, but to achieve optimum grill cleanliness, run your grill brush over the grates after preheating. That way, the heat will have already begun to loosen the grit and grime that’s been stuck on your grill since your last cookout. As Chris Allingham, a blogger on Weber grills, also attests to: “There’s zero chance of forgetfulness. If you burn-off after cooking, you go into the house and enjoy your meal, only to realize 30 minutes later that your grill is still glowing cherry-red-hot out on the patio.” Our Senior Graphic Designer, Dorik Downing, also suggests an alternative to a wire brush, which has potential safety concerns. Dorik’s grill brush of choice is the “Ultimate BBQ Cleaning Tool,” a brush made from red oak that forms to the shape of the grill grates.

“What I like the most about it is that I feel like my grill is still ‘seasoned’ because the formed tool does not harshly scrape the grill like a wire brush would. A few swipes with the tool and it’s grill time!” – Dorik Downing

Additional tip: For a deeper clean, remove your grates and soak them in a bucket of soapy water before cooking.

2. Oil your grill with a paper towel soaked in vegetable oil, or use an onion

Avoid investing in cheap sprays that can cause flare-ups on the grill, and instead, simply use a paper towel soaked in vegetable oil on your grill grate. Once the towel is soaked, take a set of tongs and coat the grate entirely to prevent sticking. This tip is cost-effective and easy, making for efficient grilling and zero chance of your meat, vegetables, or seafood sticking to the grill.

You could also clean your grill grate with an onion. Amanda Perry, our Marketing Specialist, recommends this technique: “While the grill’s still hot, take a freshly halved onion, stick it on a fork, and use the cut side to rub residue off the grate. The oils in the onion will take care of most, if not all, of the grit without the elbow grease. They’ll also season the grill and add some flavor to your next meal, too.”

3. Keep a spray bottle nearby in case of flare-ups

Flare-Ups can be a scary and sudden side-effect to using a grill spray on your grill or can simply be caused by grease dripping down into the grill. While some flare-ups are small and contained, one simple trick to dousing larger flare-ups when they do occur is to keep a spray bottle filled with water nearby.

4. Invest in a grill mat

A grill mat will help reduce staining from grease that could splatter or drip out of the grill. Even if you have a drip pan, there is still a risk of grease or oil escaping the grill and staining your patio. Investing in a naturally heat-resistant grill mat could ensure a greater longevity to your patio surface.

5. Try additive-free lump charcoal

For those grill masters that favor charcoal grills, consider trying additive-free lump charcoal, a more environmental-friendly substitute to normal briquettes (which normally contain wood scraps, sawdust, coal dust, sodium nitrate, borax, and additional additives). We also recommend avoiding lighter fluid altogether when lighting your grill, as it releases volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the air, which can leave unsanitary residue on the food you’re grilling. Our Senior Graphic Designer, Dorik Downing, recommends 100% Lump Charcoal, which he uses on his Kamado Joe grill.

6. Line kettle basin with aluminum foil

By adding aluminum foil to the interior of your kettle grill, you will easily be able to dispose of the charcoal ash after grilling, as opposed to having to clean out the interior of the grill later.

7. Use a chimney starter to light charcoal

Using a chimney starter to light your charcoal in either a grill or a smoker is an efficient way to get the coals hot and avoid lighter fluid. Here’s a walkthrough on how to use a chimney starter and some basic safety tips. We recommend the Weber 7416 Rapidfire Chimney Starter since it holds more charcoal than other chimney starters and is rust-resistant.

8. Limit the times you open a grill or smoker to check the progress of your food

The more you open a grill or smoker, the more inconsistent the heat levels in your grill will be. For a gas grill, opening the lid too much can cause lower cooking temperatures and slower cooking time. For charcoal grills, opening the lid causes your food to actually cook quicker since the oxygen from the air makes the coals hotter. Bobby Flay, chef and TV host, recommends to “stop playing with the food when it is on the grill. Leave it be. Let your meat or chicken or fish or veggies form a crust and naturally release from the grates. Only flip it once so the burger or fish doesn’t fall apart.” As the old saying goes, “if you’re looking, it ain’t cooking!”

9. Let your food come to room temperature before grilling*, and then let it rest ten minutes after cooking.

Wolfgang Puck, chef and restaurateur, says that “Allowing the meat to come to room temperature is one of the most important parts of grilling that home cooks often forget. This will lessen the steak’s cooking time and help perfect an evenly cooked piece of meat. If the steak is cold when you put it on the grill, it will overcook the outer part of the meat, drying it out while you wait to cook the internal part of the meat to the desired temperature.” Also, letting the meat rest after cooking for about ten minutes will ensure the redistribution of the juices and ultimately a better flavor.

Additional tip*: Don’t leave the meat out at room temperature for more than an hour in case bacteria begin to grow.

10. Add some oil to your favorite dry rubs

Heather Thomas, our Ecommerce Marketing Specialist, recommends coating a dry rub lightly with olive oil to “…seal in the flavors during the marination process and lessen spice loss while flipping. In my experience, it also has the added benefit of changing up the texture of cooked meat to be a bit crispier on the outside and juicier on the inside, especially when combined with fresh garlic.”

11. Use a Dutch oven or a large pot with a lid when transporting your cooked meats inside

Brad Dorcik, one of our online merchandisers, recommends this tip to keep your cooked food “moist, juicy, and warm until it’s time to chow down.”

Sunbrella BBQ Grill Cover

12. Throw a grill cover on!

What better way to protect what you love most than by covering it? Adding a grill cover to your grill reduces the risk of your grill rusting, as well as protects it from weathering and damage from UV rays. We recommend these products for optimum protection from the elements and an enjoyable grill experience. Also, check out one of our earlier blog posts on how to measure your grill for a cover.

Consider putting these tips and tricks to the test for any fun, outdoor grill experience you’re planning for the Fourth of July, and for the rest of national grilling month. Happy grilling!

12 Grill Tips/Tricks

10 Tips For July 4


It’s almost here. Can you believe it? Just as we were gearing up for Spring, along came Summer and the 4th is right around the corner.  In the Pacific Northwest, we like to say that Summer doesn’t officially start until after the 4th of July. The past few years we’ve seen plenty of sun and long warm nights leading into the holiday, but this year has given us a more cloudy lead-in to the firework extravaganza. Wednesday (the Fourth is unfortunately mid-week this year) will hopefully be a great day to go outside.

We are at least, looking forward to a day or at least evening of getting to enjoy some sun, time with friends and family, and the general festivities. It’s a holiday during peak summer weather with most celebrations being focused on the outdoors, especially around pools, parks and backyards. Heading into this celebratory time, we wanted to share some pointers on having a wonderful, memorable outdoor experience on your Independence Day this year.

  1. Make sure your grill is clean and ready for the big day. There’s no doubt that the Fourth is a favorite for grilling and July is National Grilling Month. Take a few minutes this weekend to clean up the area around your grill and make sure you’ve got the cooking grates clear of excessive debris.
  2. Quick Cleaning. Give the whole deck area a quick cleaning or once-over inspection so you can be sure that your yard is ready for the anticipated influx of friends, children, and pets. A well-kept backyard is also a great way to impress your guests and tell them that you were looking forward to them coming over to celebrate.
  3. Stock up on meat (or your favorite meat substitute). Don’t forget to add your favorite grilling meats to your grocery list sooner rather than later. With everyone thinking about flavorful hamburgers, juicy hot dogs, and tender chicken it’s in your best interest to stock up before the night before.
    Image: Delish
  4. Try a fun corn recipe. As far as side dishes on the grill, it’s hard to go wrong with corn, especially for outdoor eating occasions. It is fairly self-contained as well as pre-portioned. Cooking it with salt, pepper, and butter is the age-old standby; however, adding some accent spices or experimenting with cooking in and out of the husk could bring a layer of flavor to the golden vegetable.

  5. Include fresh fruit on the table. Fresh fruit is healthy option to have on the table, with a high water content to subtly help with hydration. Strawberries and blueberries make a great addition to any dessert dish, or can be served fresh (and are easy to plate with a dynamic visual effect). Another great fruit to include this time of year is watermelon.
  6. Bring on the colorful food. Food should be fun–especially on a  holiday. Check out this list of awesome red, white, and blue deliciousness to make your backyard the go-to for the neighborhood party.
  7. Decorate. Take some time to prep your outdoor area. Paper lanterns, string lights, and flags are summer favorites. Add in some celebratory color. For those that find most red, white, and blue color schemes to be a bit overwhelming, check out the modern, coordinated colors of the Montlake FadeSafe Collection–pairing a Heather Indigo cushion with an Antique Beige umbrella can liven up your patio subtly. There are some particularly patriotic options for steel and wooden hammock+stand combos.
  8. Stay Hydrated. Seriously. Even if you’re spending time in and around the water, your body still needs to have liquids replenished. Water should be the focus throughout the day, especially when you have anything alcoholic planned for the evening.

  9. Make sure your patio has options for shade. Summertime sunshine is hopefully in your local forecast for the Fourth. While the light is always welcome, keep in mind the heat and potential harm from UV rays. Make sure you have a sport/sweat resistant sun screen on hand. Sun screen is a must for your skin, but adding an umbrella to your patio goes a long way, especially ones with high UPF ratings. Montlake Umbrellas have a UPF rating of 50.

  10. Take some time to review firework safety. It’s one of the highlights of the evening, gathering together with your friends and family to watch a grand display or put on one of your own. It’s a night of light displays, sparklers, rockets, and more. However, it’s always a good idea to keep in mind general safety for fireworks, as well as local regulations and fire bans in the area. Be sure to take extra care when handling any kind of firework on your own, and be aware of the risks of firework smoke inhalation.

Have fun. Regardless of the amount of time you may or may not have off, be sure to spend whatever time you do have with your friends and family.

Be safe and make it a great celebration.

10 Tips For July 4

Back at the grill with Dorik

We are kicking off our Vlog series with Dorik Downing. You remember him from his earlier blog spotlight Grilling with Dorik.

Well we just had a Summer Potluck here at Classic Accessories with our Business Development team that consists of our Product Design, Development, Creative, E-Commerce and Marketing Teams and that day he made us his famous D’s Burgers.
We decided to get his process in our first Vlog. Check it out below:

Sources:
Dorik Downing
Heather Thomas
Brad Dorcik

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Back at the grill with Dorik

A grilled Thanksgiving

As good as a cooked turkey smell is on the best Thursday of the year, would you skip the delicious homemade smell and swap out a kitchen empty of dirty dishes? Why not think about grilling up your Tom Turkey this holiday? We found a great, and more importantly EASY recipe for getting the perfect bird on your table this year with at What’s Cooking America.

Prep Time: 30 minutes  |  Cook Time: 20 mins. per lb.  |  Yield: serves many

Ingredients:

  • 1 (15 to 20 pound) turkey, fresh or thawed, with giblets and neck removed.
  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature or softened, divided
  • Turkey Stuffing or your favorite stuffing/dressing recipe
  • 3 to 4 slices uncooked bacon
  • Basting Juice (see recipe below) or use the juices that drain off

Instructions:

Clean turkey well, removing any bits of pin feathers and cleaning the cavity of any remaining pieces of innards. Pat dry with paper towels. Secure legs with twine or a clip (optional).

Preheat barbecue grill. Instead of using a roasting pan, it is easier to use a homemade pan from extra heavy duty foil (using three layers of aluminum foil and making it just big enough to hold the bird – the sides need to be about 2 1/2-inches high).

Rub the inside cavity of the turkey with 1/4 cup of the softened butter.

Stuff the inside cavity with your favorite stuffing/dressing recipe. Also place a little stuffing in the neck cavity, tuck the neck skin under and skewer shut. With any remaining turkey stuffing, stuff a little of it between the skin and the breast meat.
With the remaining 1/4 cup butter, rub some over the skin of the turkey.  Salt and pepper the turkey and place the slices of uncooked bacon on top of the prepared turkey.

Place the turkey crosswise on the gas or charcoal grill so that the pan is evenly distributed over the two sets of jets.  Set the flame so that a temperature of 300 to 325 degrees F. is maintained (usually the lowest setting).  Cover with heavy duty aluminum foil for the majority of the cooking time.  Estimated cooking time is approximately 20 minutes per pound at 300 degrees F.

Remove the aluminum foil for the last hour of cooking.  Every once in while, baste the turkey with the juices (or with the basting juice recipe below).  If you have “hot spots” in the jets of the grill, twice during the cooking turn the turkey around (and the pan, of course) so that one side is not more cooked than another.

Toward the end of the cooking time, open the grill and insert the meat thermometer into the fleshy part of the thigh and cook until the internal temperature reaches 165° F. (remember that the turkey will continue to cook after it is removed from the heat of the fire).  NOTE: The USDA has come up with a one-temperature-suits-all for poultry safety: 165° F.  For safety and doneness, the internal temperature should be checked with a meat thermometer.

It is important to use a meat thermometer with a cable attached to the meat probe tip.  This will allow for the meat probe tip to stay in the turkey during the entire cooking process while the barbecue lid is closed and give you a continuous temperature reading of the meat to ensure it does not overcook.

In the absence of a meat thermometer, pierce the turkey with a fork in several places; juices should be clear with no trace of pink.  NOTE: The old-fashioned way of wiggling the leg to see if it’s loose will give you an indication that the turkey is ready, but unfortunately, by the time the leg is truly loose, the turkey is sadly overcooked.  The only reliable test for doneness is to check the internal temperature with a meat thermometer in the thickest part of the thigh, without touching the bone.

Allow the cooked turkey to sit for approximately 10 to 15 minutes before carving.

Basting Juice:

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • Neck and gizzard
  • 2 teaspoons chopped dried rosemary
  • 3 cups chicken stock or water
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 cup sweet Marsala wine or port wine*
  • 1/2 cup dry vermouth or white wine*
  • Juice from two lemons

*Use any red wine that you have.  You could also substitute the vermouth for additional red wine.

In a heavy pot over medium-high heat, melt butter; sauté onion until just translucent.  Add the neck and gizzard; continue cooking for approximately 4 minutes.  Add the rosemary and chicken stock or water; simmer until reduced by halve.  Remove from heat and strain well.

Use the gizzard and neck in the stuffing or the gravy.  For the basting juice, mix together the strained stock mixture, marsala or port wine, vermouth, and the juice of the lemons.

Now that it’s done … Check out how to carve it with Thomas Joseph @ Martha Stewart’s Kitchen Conundrums:

We hope you have a very Happy Thanksgiving weekend!
Come check out our sale going on NOW through Cyber Monday

Photo Credits:
Classic Accessories
Con Poulos/Food & Wine
beccajulia @ All Recipes
The Foodiciary

 

A grilled Thanksgiving

Grilling with Dorik

Dorik Downing is one of our Senior Graphic Designers here at Classic Accessories. He has been an amazing leader within our creative department and has helped to establish our current branding. He uses his expertise to develop a vast majority of our packaging displays, design for in store retailers, catalogs, and much much more. So the next time you see one of our packages, it’s more than likely it started out as a sketch on Dorik’s desk. Not only is he a HUGE talent for Classic, Dorik is also an amazing artist and an impressive griller … just ask him for his favorite recipe and he’ll tell you:
“Anything that’s on my grill!”

{Dorik at his Kamado Joe grilling up burgers}
Here’s his recipe:

D’s Burgers

The burger part:

  • 1 lb 80/20 Beef
  • 1/2 lb ground pork
  • 12 oz cooked spinach
  • 6 oz queso fresco
  • 1TB Worcestershire sauce
  • Salt and Pepper.

Mix all that and make about 3” size meatballs.
(I like pressing my pattys down with a large spatula and a hot grill)
Grill to your liking and top with Montery jack cheese and little more queso fresco.
Let melt of course and layer on sautéed onions

OK, now assembly:

Toasted Preztle Buns
Layer of Mayo and SOB hot sauce mix**
Layer of Homemade Guacamole
A few Blue Corn chips
Place burger on the chips
Top with nitrate free bacon and your favorite greens.
Finish by smashing down the top bun and go for it.

Dorik also makes his very own hot sauce called S.O.B – Son of Butch:
SOB
This guy LOVES his hot sauce. After many flavors and brands, he really figured out that he loves the smoky flavor of chipotle peppers as they balance out the other spices in the sauce. His favorite sauce, aside from his own would be Moon Shine Madness. He affectionately named his hot sauce with his dad’s old high school nickname: Butch. That’s his artwork on the label (told ya he’s a man of many talents!) I personally own some and really like it on fried razor clams, and it’s just the right amount of HOT with a smoky finish that really rounds out the flavors.

 

He recommends Shoe String Sweet Potatoes seasoned with Old Bay for sides:
ShowStringSweets2

… And of course for dessert … he moved over to the fire pit for s’mores
Smores_Fire

Dorik grills on his Kamado Joe at home. Here’s what Kamado Joe says about their grills:

KamadoCooking

“An ancient, Asian-style grill, the kamado is a thick-walled cooker that imparts rich, smoky flavor to meats, fish and vegetables. Relatively unchanged for centuries, air flows through the grill’s ceramic body and out its vented dome, chunk charcoal comes to life as smoke and heat. Kamado Joe is proud to draw on that tradition, modernizing the grill’s classic style with unparalleled craftsmanship, innovative accessories and a range of flexible cooking surfaces.”  Find more of their own recipes here.

KamadoCooking2

We are celebrating Memorial Weekend on classicaccessoris.com with 20% off our NEW Montlake Patio Furniture Covers and 20% off ALL Grill Covers with discount codes: Montlake20 and Grilling20 at checkout.

Have a great long weekend!

  Image Credits:
  Kamado Joe.com
  Shoe String Sweets: www.idratherbeachef.com
  Smores: kevinandamanda.com

 

Grilling with Dorik

Grilling Essentials – Cleaning tips with Alton Brown

Here’s a quick video from Food Network’s Alton Brown on how to clean your grill. GrillingEssentialsEven every day household items will do! We would also suggest after the cleaning is done and your grill has totally cooled – cover it with one of our grill collection covers to keep it ready for your next BBQ this season.

Happy Friday.

 

Grilling Essentials – Cleaning tips with Alton Brown

Cooking with …

Brought to you by one of our amazing retailers … COOK with Cabela’s!

Cook_With_Cabelas

On their site you can find full episodes, recipes, how-tos and product reviews.

I came across it while pinning some fun camping-inspired meals and found an awesome Charred Salsa recipe that will go just fine on my grill at home or when we’re off in the woods. From Pheasant Pepper Couscous to Elk Bourguignon, they have recipes for all types of game, large and small that come straight from their experienced outfitters and pro staffers at Cabela’s.

Great place to shop and try new recipes for your weekend tags or the stock in your freezer.

We know some of the best times spent hunting, are actually back at home.

Cooking with …